Sixteen Candles

Sixteen Candles. Universal Pictures 1984.

Before watching the movie:

From what I’ve read about the plot… haven’t I seen this movie? Wait, no. It’s just that half of the teen angst movies in existence use similar plots. Molly Ringwald won’t be happy with anybody but the most popular boy in school, while there’s a dorky kid hovering over her who’s got a crush on her.

There’s also something about her family forgetting her birthday, so she’s extra keen to get noticed by said popular boy. I’d rather not be so sarcastic, but it’s such a stock story. It’s going to have a lot to make up for in the execution.

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Revenge of the Nerds

Revenge of the Nerds.Interscope Communications 1984.

Before watching the movie:

I guess one can look at this movie as the beginning of geek acceptance. It looks like it’s going to be a rehash of all the old awful stereotypes of what geeks are, but they’re the heroes, so it’s already a minor improvement.

Some names in the cast that I recognize: John Goodman and James Cromwell. I don’t expect important roles though. They strike me as mentions because they got famous.

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Moscow on the Hudson

Moscow on the Hudson. Columbia Pictures 1984.

Before watching the movie:

Here’s another movie about which I know absolutely nothing, found through automated recommendations. On the one hand, it’s Robin Williams in the 80s, so it could be a wacky fish out of water comedy. On the other, they say that when Robin Williams wears a beard, he thinks it’s a serious film. I’m getting vibes of The Terminal and Being There, a pair of movies very unlike each other.

What I’m ultimately expecting is a comedy with a lot of warmth, patriotism, and jokes stolen from Yakov Smirnoff.

Oh look, yet another Cold War movie. I seem to have grown up from World War II into the next big one.

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The Zany Adventures of Robin Hood

The Zany Adventures of Robin Hood. Charles Fries Productions 1984.

Before watching the movie:

The concept sounds like fun. A goofy take on Robin Hood, no competence to be found with anyone, Robin needing to take out loans to support a rebellion. There are also some pretty big name stars involved.

The concept sounds like it could be funnier than Men In Tights, but I’m not seeing very promising reviews, and there’s the fact that I never heard of it and it all looks very cheap. We’ll see how this goes.

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Footloose

Footloose. Paramount Pictures 1984.

Before watching the movie:

This is another notable classic that I never got around to seeing before. I’ve been a fan of the title song ever since it was used in a 90s commercial for half a dozen Paramount movies at once, but that’s not necessarily enough to expect the others to live up to.

On the other hand, the classic status, notability of Kevin Bacon, and possibly the fact that they remade it (if it’s as good as they say it shouldn’t have needed to be remade, but that’s not an argument producers hear).

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This Is Spinal Tap

This is Spinal Tap. Spinal Tap Productions 1984.

Before watching the movie:

Mockumentaries tend to be great or mediocre. CSA: The Confederate States of America was disappointing, but mostly because I didn’t expect the direction it took, and it had a much stronger message than I imagined. As a comedy, especially one that is a cult favorite over 25 years later, I expect good things from This is Spinal Tap.

I’m not much into heavy metal, but the point is satire, so it should be pretty good. Also there are a lot of big names and big non-names (you may not recognize the name Harry Shearer, but he’s one of the core actors on The Simpsons), so a lot of star power and star talent.

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The NeverEnding Story

The NeverEnding Story. Warner Brothers 1984.

Before watching the movie:

I don’t really feel like watching this movie, but nothing else I had lined up interested me either. This one at least is fantasy, which can tie into the Harry Potter release, which I’m staying home from in order to blog. (Also because I’m broke.)

What I know about this movie is that it’s an 80s fantasy, obviously. Also apparently a kid finds a book that writes itself as he reads it, and then he goes inside the book and participates in the story, and learns a lesson about self-esteem that in the film version he didn’t need because he wasn’t a fat loser like in the book the film is based on.

People consider this movie an inspiration. I’m hoping it will prove them right, but I’m not a big fan of 80s fantasies, or 80s feel-good movies. Why am I watching this again?

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A Nightmare on Elm Street

 

A Nightmare on Elm Street. New Line Cinema 1984.

Before watching the movie:

I don’t necessarily favor special holiday editions of everything. In fact, I avoided doing anything special for Christmas and New Year’s last year. This Halloween, I’m in the mood to catch up on some horror classics (but only the classics), which happen to be ripe YM fodder in that they’re old and they’re fresh to me.

“Nightmare” is the earliest horror movies to attract my attention. Dreams, telepathy, and pushing the limits of the mind has always been an interest of mine. A psycho who kills by entering your dreams is one of the scariest fantasies I can think of, forget the fingerblades.

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